Conservation: Denver Water is considering a program to increase landscaping that is appropriate to the area’s semi-arid environment

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From The Denver Post (Bruce Finley):

Denver Water authorities this week revealed they’re considering paying residents to rip out lawns and replace them with landscapes better suited to the semi-arid environment…

Castle Rock residents today use 84 gallons of water per person per day on average, down 8 percent from the 92 gallon average in 2003. Water use in Douglas County overall decreased by 32 percent from 215 gallons per person per day to 146, according to state data. The growing push for water conservation has nudged Castle Rock ahead of Denver, where utilities officials this week pegged household-only water consumption at 86 gallons per person per day, down from 104 in 2000. (In Europe and Australia, municipal water use has been reduced to 40 gallons per person per day.)

More conservation coverage here.

One thought on “Conservation: Denver Water is considering a program to increase landscaping that is appropriate to the area’s semi-arid environment

  1. This is a brilliant idea. Hopefully, they will get the money and support to move forward.

    Bluegrass and similar types of suburban lawn varieties are for specific climates, and yet they are used everywhere from Las Vegas to Wisconsin, as the only landscape solution. The perfect lawn has led many people away from choosing plants that are native to their climate. When customers remove their lawns, surrounding neighbors will see alternative landscaping possibilities which hopefully will sway them to try something less water intensive. The new landscapes will be interesting to see. Good luck.

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