Cyanotoxins, Nutrients, and Public Health @CFWEWater @COWaterCongress

This is a Colorado Foundation for Water Education webinar in partnership with the Colorado Water Congress. The webinar focuses on cyanotoxins and algal blooms – how they’re affected by nutrients and nonpoint source pollution, and how Coloradans in rural and urban areas alike are working to address these threats to our water quality and public health.

During this hour-long webinar, speakers explain the causes and challenges of coping with algal blooms and cyanotoxins; The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s health advisories and criteria for cyanotoxins; the link between algal blooms and nutrients; Colorado’s Regulation 85; and nutrient management and outreach efforts in the state.

@CFWEWater: 2017 President’s Reception

Click here to go to the website to register.

Friday May 12, 2017 – 6 PM

Denver Art Museum

This year’s recipients:

Eric Kuhn along the banks of the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, general manager of the Colorado River District. Photo via the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.

Eric Kuhn, Colorado River District

Diane Hoppe Leadership Award

Eric Kuhn, “big thinker, deep thinker,” is how his colleague Jim Pokrandt describes him. Thirty-six years ago, in the spring of 1981, Kuhn moved from southern California to join the Colorado River District’s staff as assistant secretary engineer… Read more about Eric Kuhn here.

Photo credit Marketplace

Drew Beckwith, Western Resource Advocates

Emerging Leader Award

Drew Beckwith, water policy manager for Western Resources Advocates, devotes himself to Colorado’s water conservation future. His particular focus is municipal water conservation and land use planning… Continue to read about Drew Beckwith here.

The March 2017 “Headwaters Pulse” is hot off the presses from @CFWEwater

Click here to read the newsletter. Here’s an excerpt:

“Why waste water?” That’s the campaign for this year’s World Water Day, coming up next week on March 22, as designated by the United Nations. It’s a day to celebrate water and take action to tackle the world water crisis. In Colorado, while some organizations are working internationally to increase access to water and to boost public health through increased sanitation, many will be celebrating and taking action closer to home.

How will you mark World Water Day? We have some ideas…

  • Revel in your connection, through waterways, to other parts of the world—Colorado is a headwaters state after all. Or consider how infrastructure connects so many of us to adequate clean water supplies and wastewater treatment systems.
  • Get physical by tackling a home-improvement project to conserve water, like building and installing a rain barrel. If you’re registered to join our sold-out workshop on March 24, you’ll be doing just that!
  • Learn and share new information about Colorado water, wastewater, sanitation, conservation, or water reuse by checking out our publications, connecting with your water or wastewater provider, or attending an upcoming event—find some upcoming offerings at the end of this email.
  • Support an organization doing water work that you can get behind (hint, hint).
  • …and, well, the list goes on. Here at the Colorado Foundation for Water Education, we’ll celebrate with a blog post or two. Plus, the timing is right to share the feature article below on water reuse.

    It’s great to feel the global connection with others celebrating and working with water on March 22, but we hope that your commitment to water extends beyond the day, perhaps to encompass this week…or if you’re like our team, every day is water day. Carry the spirit of World Water Day forward by joining us to connect with friends and learn about water on any or all of our upcoming tours, workshops or webinars this spring and summer.

    Tenth Water Leaders Cohort Prepares for First Class

    Your Water Colorado Blog

    trolly 2 Participants in the 2016 Water Leaders class brainstorm how to use our strengths in solving problems, with the help of facilitator Cheryl Benedict.

    The Colorado Foundation for Water Education is excited to announce its 2017 Water Leaders class, as participants ready for their first day of an eight-month journey that begins next week on Monday, March 13. The Water Leaders program is recognized as the premier professional development course for Colorado’s water community. This year will mark the 10th graduating class of Water Leaders, and CFWE could not be more proud of program’s evolution.

    Through the Water Leaders program, CFWE aims to positively impact the Colorado water profession by developing a pipeline of water leaders across diverse fields with the knowledge and skills to navigate the complex world of Colorado water.

    The 15 participants in the 2017 cohort have been selected through a very competitive application process. Welcome to the 2017…

    View original post 71 more words

    The February 2017 “Headwaters Pulse” is hot off the presses from @CFWEwater

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    Click here to read the newsletter. Here’s an excerpt:

    The Rural Water Conundrum

    Roughly 20 percent of Colorado citizens rely heavily on groundwater for their drinking water supply. Many live in small communities: 98 percent of Colorado’s water systems serve communities smaller than 10,000 people. For small, rural water providers, limiting the risk of chronic health conditions ranging from kidney and liver disease to cancer means contending with a long list of federally regulated contaminants. Emerging and unregulated contaminants pose additional challenges. As rural communities work to reduce health risks, they also struggle to spread the costs of water testing and treatment over small populations, while keeping up with changing regulations and the evolving science of water pollution.

    Meanwhile, private well owners remain exempt from any water quality regulations, but bear the weighty responsibility of essentially operating their own personal utilities by constructing their own wells and testing and treating drinking water. They count on state and federal groundwater laws to keep their water sources free of some pollutants, but ensuring clean water means paying for water testing and treatment while keeping accurate maintenance records. And yet, many well owners test their drinking water less frequently than state health officials recommend, and high costs are partly to blame. Some groundwater experts believe state government should do more to require or subsidize private well testing, but at least for now, relying on a private well means taking your family’s health into your own hands.

    Read more about rural water health challenges by checking out this full article by Nelson Harvey. Find more information on public health and water in the latest issue of Headwaters magazine.

    What’s in the Water?

    Your Water Colorado Blog

    toothbrushpastePhoto Credit: Jonas Bergsten

    There is a high likelihood that at some point in your life, you have used a product containing fluoride. Many of us have memories of fluoride treatments at the dentist’s office—either in the form of a goopy gel oozing out of ill-fitting trays or as a liquid rinse. Even as adults, most people brush their teeth twice a day with toothpaste containing fluoride; all in the interest of keeping their teeth in tip-top shape.

    But, did you know that there is a good chance that fluoride is also present in your tap water?

    Almost all water has naturally-occurring fluoride. Fluoride is a mineral—like Vitamin D or calcium—that is released from rocks into our air, soil and water; however, depending on the source of the water, fluoride is not always present in concentrations that would be optimal for preventing tooth decay. It is also possible for levels…

    View original post 1,096 more words

    The January 2017 “Headwaters Pulse” is hot off the presses from @CFWEWater

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    Click here to read the newsletter. Here’s an excerpt:

    Across the country, drinking water crises are making the news—from toxic algae to lead poisoning to a growing number of communities facing contamination from a class of manmade chemicals known as perfluorinated compounds or PFCs—raising concerns about whether the nation’s current drinking water regulations do enough to protect us.

    While there are clear rules pertaining to 93 federally regulated drinking water contaminants, there are no national drinking water standards for algal cyanotoxins, PFCs, or a host of other potentially harmful unregulated contaminants of emerging concern.

    Read this article and more in the recently-released issue of Headwaters magazine, where we explore the connection between public health and water, the regulations in place to keep us safe, and the question of whether those go far enough.