Eric Kuhn: I’ve always been concerned that our reliable water supply is a lot less than what we’ve been suggesting

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Here’s a look at Eric Kuhn, the Colorado River District and the future of the Colorado River, from Matt Jenkins writing for the High Country News. From the article:

Kuhn has lately become obsessed with one of the bigger riddles hanging over Colorado’s future, and his quest for answers has challenged some of the fundamental tenets of the state’s water orthodoxy.

“I’ve always been concerned that our reliable water supply is a lot less than what we’ve been suggesting,” he says. “I think there’s a lot less available than we thought there was.”

More than 3 million people in Colorado — roughly two-thirds of the state’s population — rely on water from the Colorado River. The river sustains alfalfa, apples and pears, Olathe sweet corn, and ski and ranch towns across the Western Slope. Yet its water may be even more important to the

Front Range — Denver and its cluster of urban and suburban satellites that lie hard against the eastern foothills of the Rockies.

More than a dozen tunnels channel water underneath the Continental Divide to roughly 2.5 million people on the Front Range. Moreover, the state is expected to grow by 2.9 million people over the next 25 years, and the Colorado River has long been seen as the only real source of water for the future.

So it’s not surprising that water managers have, for years, privately asked: How much more of the Colorado River can the state use?

More Coyote Gulch coverage here, here and here (Shameless plug).

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