When is it OK to water in the winter? – News on TAP

Experts recommend using a little water during prolonged dry spells when temperatures are above 40 degrees.

Source: When is it OK to water in the winter? – News on TAP

If a tree falls in the forest, does our water suffer? – News on TAP

Reducing catastrophic wildfires and restoring forests help protect the watershed and maintain the quality of our water.

Source: If a tree falls in the forest, does our water suffer? – News on TAP

@DenverWater and watershed health

Hayman burn area via The Denver Post
Hayman burn area via The Denver Post

From CBS Denver:

Denver Water is teaming up with federal and state forest services to take care of water sheds and keep drinking water clean.

That means logging dead trees in some of the areas around Denver Water reservoirs.

The company says it’s about health forests and clean water.

“The purpose of these treatments is not simply to plant trees and create a more forested area, but it is to create a more resilient ecosystem so that when fires do occur, they’re not occurring at the catastrophic level that will significantly impact our facilities,” said Denver Water CEO Jim Lochhead.

The agencies started working together in 2010 after some wildfires broke out including the Hayman Fire.

From The Denver Post (Bruce Finley):

The “Forests to Faucets” deal signed by Denver Water, the Colorado State Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service and U.S. Forest Service builds on a $33 million 2010 initiative that led to thinning on 48,000 acres of public land, utility officials said.

“We’ve seen tremendous results during the first five years of this partnership and we are excited to now expand the program to include private lands,” Denver Water manager Jim Lochhead said.

Logging contractors enlisted in the effort clear trees from beetle-ravaged forests where large wildfires and erosion threaten water supplies. Denver Water officials have said investing in forest health helps avoid having to un-clog reservoirs and water delivery systems later at far greater cost.

Water providers increasingly get involved in forest health because, with bug-infested trees dead and dying on millions of acres, weakened soils can erode, especially after fire and heavy rain. This means more sediment slumping into streams, rivers and reservoirs.

The idea is to reduce risks of large wildfires by creating spaces between trees in forests.

Federal forest service regional director Brian Ferebee called the partnership with Denver Water “trend-setting.”

“Together we will proactively work to conserve, maintain and restore watersheds, ecosystems and the services they provide Americans,” Ferebee said in a prepared statement.

@DenverWater, et al. to ink $33 million deal for watershed health

Strontia Springs Dam spilling June 2014 via Denver Water
Strontia Springs Dam spilling June 2014 via Denver Water

From The Denver Post (Bruce Finley):

The agreement renews partnership work Denver Water initiated in 2010 aimed at reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfires.

New restoration and “wildfire fuels reduction” projects will be done on more than 40,000 acres of watershed deemed critical, according to a U.S. Forest Service announcement.

Denver Water manager Jim Lochhead, U.S. Forest Service regional director Brian Ferebee, Colorado State Forest Service director Mike Lester and Natural Resources Conservation Service director Clint Evan were to sign the latest deal Monday in Denver at the History Colorado Center.

The forest health work has involved clearing trees from beetle-ravaged forests where fire and erosion increasingly threaten water supplies. Lochhead has said investing in forest health helps avoid having to deal with the problem later at a much greater cost.

Water providers have ventured into forest management work because, with bug-infested trees dead and dying on millions of acres of Western forests, weakened soils can erode, especially after fire and heavy rain, releasing sediment into streams, rivers and reservoirs.

After the Buffalo Creek Fire, Denver Water had to spend $30 million dredging and unclogging the city’s Strontia Springs reservoir. An estimated 625,000 cubic yards of sediment from surrounding mountainsides, enough to cover a football field 200 feet high, slumped into the reservoir.

Federal officials have warned repeatedly in recent years that the nation’s forests are threatened like never before. The previous forest health work plan called for thinning 6,000 acres of dense forest near Denver Water’s Dillon reservoir. Denver Water and the Forest Service each contributed about $16.5 million for the work. The forest health deals create work for logging contractors.

Upgrading the water system boosts Denver economy – News on TAP

$100 million Hillcrest project among infrastructure improvements that support thousands of local construction jobs.

Source: Upgrading the water system boosts Denver economy – News on TAP

How safe are Denver Water’s dams? – News on TAP

Dam safety team conducts annual inspections, manages upgrades and trains for emergencies to keep facilities secure.

Source: How safe are Denver Water’s dams? – News on TAP

What she really wants for Valentine’s Day – News on TAP

Forget diamonds and chocolate. We have something better in mind.

Source: What she really wants for Valentine’s Day – News on TAP