Upgrading the water system boosts Denver economy – News on TAP

$100 million Hillcrest project among infrastructure improvements that support thousands of local construction jobs.

Source: Upgrading the water system boosts Denver economy – News on TAP

How will global warming affect Colorado River flows?

Summit County Citizens Voice

Water woes ahead for the Southwest

qwer The Colorado River will be hit hard by climate change. @bberwyn photo.

Even if precipitation stays the same or increases slightly in the next few decades, Colorado River flows are likely to dwindle due to increasing temperatures in the West. The projected warming in the 21st century could reduce flows by half a million acre feet per year, according to a new study to be published in the AGU journal Water Resources Research.

View original post 375 more words

#Snowpack news: SW basins lead the way = 157% of normal

Click on a thumbnail graphic to view a gallery of snowpack data from the NRCS.

And here’s the Westwide basin-filled map for February 20, 2017.

westwidesnotel0220017

Will water get too expensive for some Americans? – News on TAP

Denver falls well below the national average but faces the same infrastructure costs that drive up bills nationwide.

Source: Will water get too expensive for some Americans? – News on TAP

The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

One brings trains through the Rockies. The other has been delivering much-needed water for 80 years.

Source: The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

Fountain of youth in Eleven Mile Canyon – News on TAP

Still strong and sturdy, Denver Water’s second-largest reservoir turns 85 in 2017.

Source: Fountain of youth in Eleven Mile Canyon – News on TAP

West Coast facing another ‘atmospheric river’ of weather-related news

Arizona Water News

Normally, we here at Water Resources prefer to stay off the topic of “weather” and, instead, stick to longer-term climate-related conditions, particularly drought.

The 2016-2017 “water year” — officially October 2016 to September 2017 — isn’t letting us do that. It’s just been too darned wet out there to avoid observing that current weather conditions are greatly impacting long-term climate conditions.

Two big, unavoidable weather stories are happening right now: The “biggest storm of the winter” that is now hitting southern California, and the more northerly disturbance following it that will push a lot of water where none is needed right now, the area of the Oroville Dam.

While the extremely wet Western winter has driven drought off the map in much of northern California, SoCal has been much drier. The sole remaining sliver of “extreme drought” in the Golden State, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, is in the…

View original post 255 more words