Will water get too expensive for some Americans? – News on TAP

Denver falls well below the national average but faces the same infrastructure costs that drive up bills nationwide.

Source: Will water get too expensive for some Americans? – News on TAP

The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

One brings trains through the Rockies. The other has been delivering much-needed water for 80 years.

Source: The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

Fountain of youth in Eleven Mile Canyon – News on TAP

Still strong and sturdy, Denver Water’s second-largest reservoir turns 85 in 2017.

Source: Fountain of youth in Eleven Mile Canyon – News on TAP

West Coast facing another ‘atmospheric river’ of weather-related news

Arizona Water News

Normally, we here at Water Resources prefer to stay off the topic of “weather” and, instead, stick to longer-term climate-related conditions, particularly drought.

The 2016-2017 “water year” — officially October 2016 to September 2017 — isn’t letting us do that. It’s just been too darned wet out there to avoid observing that current weather conditions are greatly impacting long-term climate conditions.

Two big, unavoidable weather stories are happening right now: The “biggest storm of the winter” that is now hitting southern California, and the more northerly disturbance following it that will push a lot of water where none is needed right now, the area of the Oroville Dam.

While the extremely wet Western winter has driven drought off the map in much of northern California, SoCal has been much drier. The sole remaining sliver of “extreme drought” in the Golden State, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, is in the…

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On Drought and the “Drought Contingency Plan”: A conversation with Water Resources Director Tom Buschatzke about the on-going, multi-state struggle to save Lake Mead

Arizona Water News

The negotiations to find an equitable way to stabilize the Colorado River system and, specifically, Lake Mead have been underway for nearly four years now.

In some respects, the parties at the table – including representatives of California, Nevada, the federal government and Arizona – largely have found common ground, in principle.

In other respects — notably achieving agreement among the many stakeholders with longstanding, legal claims to water from the Colorado system, as well as the big service providers — a resolution is far less clear.

Tom Buschatzke, director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources, sat down recently to discuss the current status of the much-debated “Drought Contingency Plan” to stabilize Lake Mead, which continues dropping toward critical water levels each year, despite the occasional wet winter, such as this current one.

He also discussed – and defined – the plan that has become known as “DCP Plus”…

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The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

One brings trains through the Rockies. The other has been delivering much-needed water for 80 years.

Source: The tunnel (next to the tunnel) that no one knows – News on TAP

Main breaks 101: Raising our infrastructure GPA – News on TAP

Learn more about why pipes burst, how much water is lost and what Denver Water is doing about it.

Source: Main breaks 101: Raising our infrastructure GPA – News on TAP