Windy Gap Firming Project: Chimney Hollow update

A picture named chimneyhollowreservoir.jpg

Here’s a update on the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District’s proposed Chimney Hollow Reservoir, from Pamela Dickman writing for the Loveland Reporter Herald. From the article:

Officials at the Bureau of Reclamation will decide whether to allow the project and, if they do, what conditions will be imposed to minimize effects on the environment. Jeff Drager, project manager, told the Larimer County Commissioners on Monday that the water agency hopes to hear a decision this year. While the conservancy district is waiting for word from the federal agency, its leaders are not sitting still. They are working on ways to address concerns expressed last year when the project was open to public comment, Drager said.

At public meetings, most of the opposition came from residents who live on the Western Slope and worry about water quality and the effect to the Colorado River in Grand County.

The Larimer County commissioners, in their comments, worried about water levels and quality at Horsetooth Reservoir and Carter Lake but gave support to the project…

Drager assured the commissioners that conservancy district officials are looking at ways to ensure higher water levels at Horsetooth and to lessen the effects on water quality. These could include transferring water between reservoirs and building infrastructure or buffers to prevent agricultural runoff from entering the waterway, he said…

The conservancy district plans to work with Larimer County on the recreation component of the reservoir as well. In 2004, the district and the county bought the land, 3,400 acres total, together. The reservoir will be built on 1,600 acres, and the remaining 1,800 surrounding the reservoir will be managed by the county — an arrangement much like that at Carter Lake.

More Coyote Gulch coverage here

4 thoughts on “Windy Gap Firming Project: Chimney Hollow update

  1. There is no need for the proposed Chimney Hollow Reservoir. What is needed is better management of existing water supplies. The on-going watering of concrete and asphalt in the heat of the demonstrates appropriate management of water supplies does not exist.

  2. There is no need for the proposed Chimney Hollow Reservoir. What is needed is better management of existing water supplies. The on-going watering of concrete and asphalt in the heat of the day demonstrates appropriate management of water supplies does not exist.

  3. Thank you for publishing my previous comments on the proposed Chimney Hollow Reservoir – which is more than can be said for The Sky Hi Daily News in Grandby or The Reporter-Herald in Loveland. Neither newspaper is allowing opinion which does not support the proposal to be published, and this includes the impact the proposed reservoir would have on populations in the area, including the Golden Eagle, Red-tailed Hawks, the Great Horned Owl, deer, elk, and bear, among others.

    • James,

      No problem. Why not write something more for Coyote Gulch? I’d let you do a post or two if you’d like. Email me at coyotegulch [AT] mac [DOT] com if you’re interested.

      Water conversations in Colorado often seem to be one-sided affairs with the environment seldom at the table. For example: On the IBCC roundtable there is only one representative for conservation, environment and recreation, Melinda Kassen, from Trout Unlimited. Very frustrating for her and others.

      Don’t be too down on the newspapers though. They’re under extreme financial pressure these days and must pick and choose how they allocate their inches. They’re competing with the Internet and blogs where publishing an article is a fraction of a penny for most. The Sky-Hi Daily News has a great water reporter, Tonya Bina.

      Thanks for commenting.

      John Orr

Leave a Reply