Glenwood Springs: Improvements to whitewater park are nearly complete

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From The Aspen Times (John Gardner):

Just in time for the spring rush, riverbank improvements at the Glenwood Springs whitewater park are nearly complete. The upgrades will make the park more enjoyable for paddlers and spectators alike, according to Glenwood Parks and Recreation Director Tom Barnes. “The wave is already getting some use, which is really cool to see,” Barnes said. Work began on the park in fall 2009. Gould Construction completed the project, which cost a reported $430,000, to transform the rocky and rugged riverbanks into more of a park-like setting to accommodate spectators. While the project included development of a park and several amenities designed to make the viewing experience more comfortable, the improvements were also designed to make the wave in the river more easily accessible for paddlers. Improvements on the north and south side of the Colorado River include observation bleachers and decks for spectators. Additions also include takeouts on both the north and south sides of the river, to the west of the Midland Avenue Bridge, to provide easier exits for paddlers…

A ribbon-cutting event for the whitewater park is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 10, with ribbon cuttings at Two Rivers Park and Oasis Creek Park scheduled for 6 p.m.

More whitewater coverage here.

2010 Colorado elections: Water issues to be part of the Governor’s race?

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It looks like water will be on the minds of John Hickenlooper and Scott McInnis over the next few months. Here’s a report from Dean Humphrey writing for The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel. From the article:

“When I came into office as mayor, there was a we-versus-them mentality where towns and municipalities competed against each other for water,” the mayor said. “It was a clear case of fundamental nonsense of government. If Aurora or Douglas County ran out of water, it would be national news.” Colorado residents should realize that different parts of the state rely on other parts, and one area depriving another of something isn’t in the best interest of either, he said. “It is in the interest of the Front Range to make sure water is plentiful in the Grand Valley and the Arkansas Valley,” he said. “What is Colorado without Palisade peaches, powerful rivers or a ranching heritage?”

More 2010 Colorado elections coverage here.

Monument: No contract for Fountain Mutual Ditch Company shares

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From The Tri-Lakes Tribune (Nicole Chillino):

The board of trustees had, at its May 7 meeting, decided to go under contract with the company. In a conference call with the town’s water attorney, Bob Krassa, water engineer Bruce Lytle, town attorney Gary Shupp, trustee Gail Drumm, public works director Rich Landreth and town manager Cathy Green, the town was advised by Lytle and Krassa not to close on the purchase of the water shares, Green said. The deal would have involved the purchase of 526 shares of water in exchange for $6 million. “For us it’s all of our water money, it’s a huge risk, and if we make an investment this big we won’t have a dime for many years to come to put into anything that comes along that might be better,” Green said. She added while the town might be giving up good water rights, the staff recommended not pursuing them because it is trying to minimize the risk to the town. The contract had a lot of third-party agreements, Green said, and there was uncertainty about what that might mean for the town. There were also questions about whether the water could be exchanged upstream, whether the water could go outside the service area of the potential water provider, Comanche Resources, and how and where to store the water.

More infrastructure coverage here.

Brush: Stormwater fees to rise?

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From the Brush News-Tribune via The Fort Morgan Times (Jesse Chaney):

The Brush City Council will consider a resolution Monday that would raise storm-water fees by an additional three cents per month for each linear foot of property that touches a public street equipped with a curb and gutter. If approved, the storm-water rate would increase from 13 to 16 cents per linear foot. The new rate would take effect July 1.

More stormwater coverage here.

Cedaredge: Water rates to rise?

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From the Delta County Independent (Bob borchardt):

The current monthly base rate for domestic water users is $28.50 ($16.50 for 10,000 gallons, plus $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee. Each additional 1,000 gallons is plus $1.50). Out-of-town users pay an addition $10 per month for a base rate of $38.50. It was noted the $4 per month Capital Improvement Assessment, used to pay for improvements to 4.2 miles of waterline, is to be reduced to $3 per month in 2011, 2012, 2013 and the first four months of 2014. Cedaredge town administrator Kathleen Sickles explained that the monthly base rate does not pay for water and does not guarantee that users will get 10,000 gallons. “The base rate does not mean you have a right to receive that amount of water,” said Sickles.

Proposal 1 increases the monthly base rate to $33.50 in-town and $43.50 out-of-town ($17.50 for 10,000 gallons, plus $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee, plus an added $4 per month capital replacement fee — scheduled to go to $7 by April 2014 — to be “collected for existing capital purchases and to be retained for major capital replacement needs.” Each addition 1,000 gallons is $2.15).

Proposal 2 increases the monthly base rate to $34 in-town and $44 out-of-town. The rate structure would be $18 per month for 12,000 gallons, plus $3 per thousand gallons over the 12,000 gallons, again with a $4 per month capital replacement fee, $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee.

Proposal 3 would increase the monthly base rate to $36 in-town and $46 out-of-town. The rate structure would be $20 per month for 10,000 gallons, with $2 per additional 1,000 gallons, plus the $4 per month capital replacement fee, $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee.

Proposal 4 would increase the monthly base rate to $35 in-town and $45 out-of-town. The rate structure would be $19 per month for 10,000 gallons, with $2 per additional 1,000 gallons, plus the $4.00 per month Capital plus the $4 per month capital replacement fee, $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee.

However, the trustees appeared to favor a fifth proposal — to raise the monthly base rate to $37 in-town and $47 out-of-town with a rate structure of $21 for up to 10,000 gallons usage plus the $4 per month capital replacement fee, $4 capital improvement fee and $8 debt reduction fee.

More infrastructure coverage here.