Wastewater: Cargill Fort Morgan beef plant is getting a $6 million bacteria-based system to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus releases to the South Platte River

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From Environmental Leader:

The system will use bacteria to break down nitrogen and release nitrogen gas, thus preventing emissions into the South Platte River. Work on the project is expected to complete by the third quarter of 2012, at an estimated cost of over $6 million.

Cargill says it has already reduced nitrogen discharges at the plant by 65 percent in the past four years, and the new initiative should help the plant reach 80 or 90 percent. The company says the facility is compliant with the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment’s requirements for discharge into the South Platte River…

Most of Cargill’s meat plants use methane from wastewater lagoons to help fuel operations. Biogas now displaces at least 20 percent of natural gas demand at Cargill’s North American beef processing plants, while reducing GHG emissions by more than 1.3 million metric tons over the past four years. By the end of fiscal year 2010, Cargill obtained 11 percent of its energy from renewables, exceeding its 10 percent goal.

More South Platte River basin coverage here.

One thought on “Wastewater: Cargill Fort Morgan beef plant is getting a $6 million bacteria-based system to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus releases to the South Platte River

  1. I worked at Federal Beef Processors that operated in West Fargo, North Dakota for aprox. 20 years it is good to know the Cargill Fort Morgan beef plant is willing to upgrade their operation of their beef plant to not only their benefit but also to the benefit of preservation and growth of employment of their worforce, Thanks !!

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