NOAA State of the Climate Global Analysis March 2011: ‘The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for March 2011 was the 13th warmest on record’

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Here’s the link to the announcement from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Climatic Data Center website. From the intro page:

– The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for March 2011 was the 13th warmest on record at 13.19°C (55.78°F), which is 0.49°C (0.88°F) above the 20th century average of 12.7°C (54.9°F). This was also the 35th consecutive March with global land and ocean temperatures above the 20th century average.

– The March worldwide land surface temperature was 0.83°C (1.49°F) above the 20th century average of 5.0°C (40.8°F)—the 12th warmest March on record.

– The March worldwide ocean surface temperature was 0.36°C (0.65°F) above the 20th century average of 15.9°C (60.7°F)—also the 12th warmest March on record.

– For the year-to-date, the global combined land and ocean surface temperature of 12.73°C (54.87°F) was the 14th warmest January–March on record. This value is 0.43°C (0.77°F) above the 20th century average.

Here’s Bob Berwyn’s analysis, running in the Summit County Citizens Voice. From the article:

Across the planet’s land masses, the most prominent warmth was recorded across most of Siberia, southwestern Greenland, southern North America, and most of Africa. Cooler-than-average conditions were reported from the western half of Canada, most of Mongolia, China and southeastern Asia. A notable exception to global warmth was in Australia, which experienced its coolest March on record, with above average rainfall across the entire country.

The wettest parts of the planet included Thailand, the Philippines, many western Pacific island nations, parts of northern and eastern Australia, and a band across central South America. The driest areas included across eastern Asia, much of Europe, the central United States, parts of Canada, and Argentina.

More Climate Change coverage here and here.

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