Drew Beckwith (Western Resource Advocates): ‘The CWCB has done a tremendous service to Colorado citizens by approving these guidelines,’ for municipal conservation reporting

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Here’s the release from Western Resource Advocates (Jason Bane):

The State of Colorado has adopted a plan to create the most comprehensive water reporting guidelines in the country, positioning the state as a national leader in water conservation and supply planning.

On Wednesday, Nov. 16, the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) formally adopted new water use and conservation reporting rules, called Guidelines Regarding the Reporting of Water Use and Conservation Data by Covered Entities1. The CWCB will now develop an online reporting tool for water providers that will, for the first time, enable an aggregate picture of water use and conservation in Colorado.

“Colorado has a good record of tracking how much water comes out of rivers and watersheds, but it’s not easy to find out what happens next,” said Drew Beckwith, Water Policy Manager at Western Resource Advocates. “Providers could be doing a great job on conservation, or they could be using most of their supply for water balloons and squirt guns—that’s why comprehensive reporting is so important. The CWCB has done a tremendous service to Colorado citizens by approving these guidelines.”

Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Colorado Environmental Coalition (CEC) have been instrumental in creating these new reporting policies. In 2009 the groups jointly drafted legislation to establish new water reporting guidelines that led to the final version of HB10-10512; the bill was approved by the Colorado General Assembly in 2010, and then-Gov. Bill Ritter signed it into law on June 7, 2010. The Office of Water Conservation and Drought Planning convened 13 meetings beginning in Nov. 2010 to draft the proposed guidelines, and WRA and CEC remained involved in the process throughout.

“When the reporting process begins in 2013, Colorado will have the most comprehensive set of water data in the country,” said Beckwith. “You can only manage what you measure. This information will be incredibly helpful for statewide water supply planning and for the water suppliers themselves.”

The newly-approved water reporting guidelines include several categories:
• Water Usage: Amount of water that gets used by different customer classes (residential, commercial, etc.)
• Water Loss: Tracking water that is treated but not used for revenue-generating purposes. Includes leaks, meter inaccuracies, and other non-metered uses (such as firefighting).
• Rate Structures: Reporting rate structure types and the variable costs charged to customers.
• Water Conservation Programs: Outlines individual water conservation programs selected by each
provider.

More coverage from Chris Woodka writing for The Pueblo Chieftain. From the article:

The Colorado Water Conservation Board adopted new reporting rules at its November meeting amd over time will provide a way to measure water conservation statewide…

“Providers could be doing a great job on conservation, or they could be using most of their supply for water balloons and squirt guns — that’s why comprehensive reporting is so important. The CWCB has done a tremendous service to Colorado citizens by approving these guidelines.”

More conservation coverage here. More CWCB coverage here. More HB 10-1051 coverage here.

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