@NOAA webinar: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change from the (Climate Science Special Report) U.S. Perspective, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Click here for all the inside skinny and to register.

Water treatment operators are in high demand across #Colorado

Filter beds at a Denver Water treatment plant. Fluoride is added after filtration, prior to disinfection. Learn more about the treatment process: denverwater.org/WaterQuality/TreatmentProcess

From KOAA.com (Caiti Blase):

David Stanford, a water treatment operator in charge of Beulah’s water systems, says there’s a lot of opening in different parts of the state because older operators are retiring. However, between the years of training and sometimes small wages, replacing those people isn’t just a simple hire.

Russell Chambers, an operator in training, said, “There’s a lot to learn. It’s a pretty challenging job if you like a challenge.”

Chambers has been working at the water districts in Beulah for about four months and it’s just the beginning of his journey to get a Level B certification in order to become a qualified water treatment operator in the valley.

Stanford said, “It does take a lot of learning, a lot of certification, a lot of on the job training.”

The training can take several years.

Stanford said, “You have to know and understand every facet of how to get the water here, get it through the plant, and get it to the customer.”

Which is why it’s time to start training the next generation.

“In the state of Colorado the operators from the 70’s and 80’s, that team is retiring for the most part so there’s a lot of openings in many, many places for training operators.”

Stanford knows just how important this position is.

“I’m responsible for the lives of nearly 600 people that live in this valley. On a daily basis it is my responsibility to deliver to them drinking water that is safe to drink.”

Until Chambers is fully-certified, Stanford is “the guy that has to call the shots and is ultimately responsible for everything that happens with the water.”

It’s why bringing in and training newcomers is an important facet for towns like Beulah.

@OmahaUSACE: Urban Waterways Study Recommendations. Join us July 31, Aug. 1 and 2

This is an email update. The Corps of Engineers want to hear from everybody. From their email:

This is a friendly reminder to come and learn about and provide feedback on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recommendations for the South Platte River, Weir Gulch, and Harvard Gulch.

All meetings begin at 5:30 pm. There will be a presentation at 6:00 pm followed by an open house until 7:30 pm.

July 31, Weir Gulch Study – Barnum Recreation Center, 360 Hooker Street.

August 1, South Platte River Study – REI, 1416 Platte Street (3rd Floor).

August 2, Harvard Gulch Study – Porter Hospital, 2525 S. Downing Street (Grand Mesa Conference Room).

In 2015, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the City and County of Denver began a feasibility study of three urban waterways in Denver. Previous rounds of public meetings were held in both 2015 and 2016. General study background and information on the previous public meetings is available for review at http://www.denvergov.org/denverwaterways.

The ecological health of the South Platte River has been adversely affected by encroaching urbanization and past flood control projects. The primary goal of the South Platte River recommendations is to develop a cost-effective, multi-pronged approach to river restoration that will restore ecosystem habitat, with secondary goals to improve water quality and reduce flood risk, where feasible.

Weir Gulch and Harvard Gulch have been primarily impacted by encroaching urbanization. For Weir Gulch, the primary goal is flood risk reduction, with a secondary goal of ecosystem restoration, where feasible. For Harvard Gulch, the primary goal is flood risk reduction through implementing nonstructural flood risk management measures to individual homes and businesses within the floodplain. On all three waterways, a complementary goal is to improve community access to recreational and environmental education opportunities.

The draft feasibility report and environmental impact statement and study recommendations will be released on July 2nd and will be available at: http://www.nwo.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Planning/Project-Reports/

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is partnering with the City and County of Denver, the Greenway Foundation, the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board to complete the study.

The Denver Urban Waterways Restoration Study is scheduled for completion in 2019. The study marks the beginning of a long-term partnership to secure funding, plan, design, and build the selected alternatives.

From email from Zoeller Consulting (Hora Neureiter) via the City and County of Denver (Denver Urban Waterways):

The public is invited to learn about and provide feedback on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recommendations for the South Platte River, Weir Gulch, and Harvard Gulch.

All meetings begin at 5:30 pm. There will be a presentation at 6:00 pm followed by an open house until 7:30 pm.

July 31, Weir Gulch Study – Barnum Recreation Center, 360 Hooker Street.

August 1, South Platte River Study – REI, 1416 Platte Street (3rd Floor).

August 2, Harvard Gulch Study – Porter Hospital, 2525 S. Downing Street (Grand Mesa Conference Room).

In 2015, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the City and County of Denver began a feasibility study of three urban waterways in Denver. Previous rounds of public meetings were held in both 2015 and 2016. General study background and information on the previous public meetings is available for review at http://www.denvergov.org/denverwaterways.

The ecological health of the South Platte River has been adversely affected by encroaching urbanization and past flood control projects. The primary goal of the South Platte River recommendations is to develop a cost-effective, multi-pronged approach to river restoration that will restore ecosystem habitat, with secondary goals to improve water quality and reduce flood risk, where feasible.

Weir Gulch and Harvard Gulch have been primarily impacted by encroaching urbanization. For Weir Gulch, the primary goal is flood risk reduction, with a secondary goal of ecosystem restoration, where feasible. For Harvard Gulch, the primary goal is flood risk reduction through implementing nonstructural flood risk management measures to individual homes and businesses within the floodplain. On all three waterways, a complementary goal is to improve community access to recreational and environmental education opportunities.

The draft feasibility report and environmental impact statement and study recommendations will be released on July 2nd and will be available at:

http://www.nwo.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Planning/Project-Reports/

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is partnering with the City and County of Denver, the Greenway Foundation, the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board to complete the study.

The Denver Urban Waterways Restoration Study is scheduled for completion in 2019. The study marks the beginning of a long-term partnership to secure funding, plan, design, and build the selected alternatives.