Mothering nature — one day at a time

Mile High Water Talk

When it comes to protecting our most precious resource, every day is Earth Day.

By Dana Strongin

Mother Earth does a lot for human life, and she deserves her day of honor — which is scheduled for today, April 22.

But what about the other 364 days?

At Denver Water, we take environmental stewardship seriously, every single day. This means we are always taking measures big and small to protect and care for our Earth.

So, in honor of Earth Day, here’s a paperless shout-out — and just a few examples of the many ways we work to serve and support our environment every day.

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Happy(?) #EarthDay 2016 #ClimateChange

earthday2016

Click here to go to EarthDay.org to learn about opportunities and celebrations.

Map: Land and ocean temperature departure from average for March 2016. (NOAA NCEI)
Map: Land and ocean temperature departure from average for March 2016.
(NOAA NCEI)

Southeastern #Colorado Water board meeting recap

From The Pueblo Chieftain (Chris Woodka):

Full reservoirs in the Arkansas River basin point to the need for even more storage when dry years return, the Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District learned Thursday.

“I don’t think people realize how close we were to spilling water this year,” said Jim Broderick, executive director. “This is the reason you need more storage. People think of storage only during drought and when it’s flooding. We need to get past that and look at additional storage to capture more water.”

The storage situation may not be entirely settled, because heavy rain in May could mean some water safely stored may be released.

“Unless we have another Miracle May, we’ll be all right,” said Phil Reynolds, of the Colorado Division of Water Resources.

To get to “all right,” however, water users have cooperatively released water from Lake Pueblo to meet flood control requirements.

Capacity in Lake Pueblo was decreased by 11,000 acre-feet, to a total of 245,000 acre-feet, this year because of sedimentation. Space for 93,000 acre-feet is reserved for flood control after April 15. That was complicated this year because of high residual storage from 2015.

Aurora, whose water would be first to spill, leased its stored water to farmers last year. The Pueblo Board of Water Works used early leases to move some of its water out of storage, but still has higher than usual levels in reserve.

The Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District moved about 1,500 acre-feet into the permanent pool at John Martin. Colorado Parks and Wildlife moved 5,000 acre-feet of water it leased into Trinidad Reservoir.

But the valley may be running out of places to store water.

“Moving forward in how we move and manage water, storage is a key component,” said Alan Hamel, who was president of the Southeastern district board when the Preferred Storage Option Plan was developed and now represents the basin on the Colorado Water Conservation Board. “This basin needs water storage in the upper basin, more in Pueblo and below Pueblo.”

PSOP, which developed in the late 1990s, was abandoned by the district after multiparty negotiations broke down in 2007, but certain elements moved ahead. One of those was how excess capacity in Lake Pueblo could be better used.

Right now, there are about 27,000 acre-feet of water in the so-called if-and-when accounts that might be vulnerable to spills. Another 57,000 acre-feet of winter water likely would not spill this year, unless more water than expected is collected through the Fryingpan-Arkansas Project.

About 65,000 acrefeet of Fry-Ark water is expected to be brought into Turquoise Lake through the Boustead Tunnel, if conditions remain average, said Roy Vaughan, manager of the project for the Bureau of Reclamation.

“But that’s a moving target,” Vaughan said.

"Miracle May" -- Upper Colorado River Basin May 2015 precipitation as a percent of normal
“Miracle May” — Upper Colorado River Basin May 2015 precipitation as a percent of normal

Weekend snowstorm delivers big shot of moisture

Mile High Water Talk

By Jay Adams

It was tough to shovel, but last weekend’s wet, heavy snow delivered a three-day punch of liquid gold for Denver Water.

The storm ramped up on April 15 and finally cleared out on April 17. When it was over, 2 to 4 feet of snow pounded areas of Boulder, Grand, Jefferson, Park and Summit counties where Denver Water captures the snow that produces up to 80 percent of our water.

In just 72 hours, the snowpack shot up 15 percent in the Upper South Platte River basin and 9 percent in the Upper Colorado River basin. As of April 18, the snowpack for the South Platte and Colorado River basins stood at 109 and 113 percent of normal, respectively.

SP_SnowpackCO_Snowpack

“This weekend’s snowstorm was really good for our snowpack,” said Bob Steger, manager of raw water supply. That heavy, wet stuff produced around 2 inches of snow-water…

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