Snowpack news

A picture named snowpackcolorado04062010

From The Greeley Tribune (Bill Jackson):

This year’s water content is 8 percent below the same time a year ago. In a typical year, mountain snowpack totals reach their seasonal maximum totals during the month of April, which leaves only a few weeks remaining for improvements. But given the current deficit across northern Colorado, the odds of reaching a near-average snowpack are less than 10 percent at this time, [Allen Green, state conservationist with the NRCS] said…

Given the marginal snowpack conditions across much of the state, the outlook for spring and summer water supplies remains below average for most of Colorado. Near-average runoff is only expected in portions of the southern basins; elsewhere across the state, runoff volumes remain below average to well below average…

Reservoir storage continues to track at near-average volumes across most of the state, and that water should help alleviate late-summer shortages in those basins producing below-average runoff this year, state conservationist Allen Green said. Statewide, storage is 6 percent above the long-term average and 3 percent above last year.

From the Summit Daily News (Robert Allen):

The local and statewide snowpack continues to measure below average, with the Blue River Basin at 74 percent of average, as 2010 levels near their seasonal maximum…

But reservoir storage levels continue to measure near average across the state, with the Dillon Reservoir at 112 percent of average and Upper Colorado River Basin reservoirs overall at 111 percent of average…

The Blue River Basin snowpack by the end of March had fallen 3 percent from February’s level of 77 percent. The measurement at the Snake River fell 9 percent last month to 24 percent of average — or only 10 inches of snow depth and 1.9 inch of water content.

From the Pikes Peak Courier View:

The April 1 snowpack reports shows that local snowpack is well above normal, according to measurements collected by the Woodland Park Natural Resource Conservation Service office…

On the Pikes Peak watershed area, snowpack is 143 percent of the long term average on the North Slope and 140 percent on the South Slope…

Snowpack totals reflect these dry conditions and remain well below average. Snowpack percentages in these basins range from only 73 percent of average in the combined Yampa and White river basins to 81 percent of average in the South Platte basin. The highest snowpack percentages in the state remain in the Arkansas and Rio Grande basins, at 109 and 115 percent of average, respectively.

From The Aspen Times:

Thick dust, whipped up by high winds and probably blown in from Utah, gave parts of the Roaring Fork Valley a red, muddy rain late Monday, and left Aspen-area ski slopes sporting an off-color layer beneath Tuesday’s powder…

Aspen Mountain and Snowmass both picked up 7 inches of new snow overnight, but Beaver Creek and Vail were the big winners as the latest spring storm swept into the mountains of Colorado. Beaver Creek reported 14 inches of new snow Tuesday morning, while Vail had 13 inches.

From Real Vail.com (Reid Griebling):

Vail reported 11 inches this morning and the Beav’ has reported a whopping 13 inches as of 5 a.m…

Storm totals will range between 16 and 24 inches by Wednesday morning, with the highest elevations seeing well over 2 feet. Great news for snow riders and summer water enthusiasts as the Colorado River Basin has been thirsty for months.

Leave a Reply