@UNLincoln: Seminar series focuses on efficient water use

The High Plains Aquifer provides 30 percent of the water used in the nation's irrigated agriculture. The aquifer runs under South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas.
The High Plains Aquifer provides 30 percent of the water used in the nation’s irrigated agriculture. The aquifer runs under South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas.

From the University of Nebraska – Lincoln via The Scottsbluff Star-Herald:

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s spring semester water and natural resources seminar will delve into aspects of “the right water for the right use at the right time.”

Free public lectures are 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. roughly every other Wednesday through April 19 in the first-floor auditorium of Hardin Hall, northeast of North 33rd and Holdrege streets on East Campus.

The schedule is:

> Feb. 1, Jason White, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, “Engineered Nanoparticles in Food: Implications for Food Safety and Consumer Health.” This lecture begins at 2:30 p.m.

> Feb. 15, Ryan Bailey, Colorado State University, “Water Quality Modeling for Groundwater, Surface Water and Watersheds: Basic Theory and Applications” (Williams Memorial Lecture).

> March 1, Jerry Kenny, Platte River Recovery Implementation Program, “The Platte River Recovery Implementation Program: What Has Been Accomplished and What Remains to be Done.”

> March 15, Siamak Nejati, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “Engineering Solutions for Cleaning Contaminated Water: Membranes for Membrane Distillation.”

> April 5, Menu Leddy, Orange County California Water District, “OCWD: Groundwater Replenishment System” (Kremer Memorial Lecture).

> April 19, Daran Rudnick, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “Advancements in Irrigation Technology and Their Impact on Water Management.”

“Our water is a finite resource with increasing demands being placed upon it every day,” said Chittaranjan Ray, Nebraska Water Center director. “Though we are increasingly aware of how, why and when we use it and are maximizing efficiencies to make it go further, we are still asking the resource to satisfy increasingly more complex and competitive demands. These lectures will shed light on some of the ways we are making progress on these issues.”

The Nebraska Water Center, part of the University of Nebraska’s Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute, has organized and helped offer the annual spring lectures for more than 40 years. Nebraska’s School of Natural Resources cosponsors the lecture series and offers it for student credit.

Lecture videos and PowerPoint presentations will be available at http://watercenter.unl.edu within a few days after each lecture. [ed. emphasis mine]

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