#Drought news: No change in depiction for #Colorado

Click here to go to the US Drought Monitor website. Here’s an excerpt:

Summary

Over the past week, moderate to heavy precipitation fell over much of the southern tier of the United States. The highest amounts occurred from eastern Texas through the Carolinas, and relatively high amounts also fell in southern California and southwestern Arizona. Elsewhere, precipitation also fell in the Coastal Ranges from northern California to the Canadian border. Cooler than normal weather occurred over most of the United States east of the Continental Divide, while warmer conditions were found in parts of California, Arizona, and southeastern New Mexico. Improvements in drought conditions occurred in the Mojave Desert regions of California and Arizona, from San Francisco Bay into the Central Valley. Drought developed or worsened in central Nevada, northwestern Oregon, from northeastern Oklahoma into southwestern Missouri, and in the Florida Peninsula…

High Plains

Weather across the High Plains this week was generally dry, with cooler weather taking place in Nebraska and Kansas, and more variable temperatures occurring in the Dakotas and in the high plains sections of Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana. Abnormally dry conditions improved in north-central Montana, as long-term precipitation deficits had lessened such that conditions were no longer abnormally dry. Elsewhere, the drought depiction was unchanged…

West

Moderate to heavy precipitation fell in the Mojave Desert region of California and Arizona, giving some of these areas 10-25% of their annual precipitation. This lessened long-term deficits in southeastern California and parts of southwestern Arizona, leading to widespread one-category improvements. Moderate drought also was removed from the San Francisco Bay to the Central Valley area, where short- and long-term precipitation deficits had been reduced enough to bring them out of moderate drought. Despite some recent precipitation in northwestern Oregon, short- and long-term precipitation deficits were large enough and surface and groundwater shortages severe enough to expand the footprint of extreme drought in this area. In central Nevada, moderate drought was introduced where precipitation deficits grew on multiple time scales and streamflow conditions worsened. Abnormally dry conditions expanded through parts of the mountains of central Idaho and in mountainous regions of northwestern Montana, where low snowpack existed and short-term precipitation deficits grew…

South

Moderate to heavy precipitation took place this week from western Texas through southern Oklahoma and central and southern Arkansas, into the Southeast. Slight improvements were made in southwestern Texas, where recent heavy rain was enough to lessen the extent of abnormally dry conditions since short-term precipitation deficits improved here. North of where the precipitation fell, abnormally dry conditions and moderate drought were expanded in north-central and northeastern Oklahoma. Elsewhere, given the widespread precipitation that fell, no changes were made to the drought depiction…

Looking Ahead

Next week, a strong storm system is forecast to develop over the southern Plains and move eastward across the United States. Moderate to heavy rain, perhaps mixed with some snow, is forecast in north Texas, and this precipitation is expected to move eastward to the southeastern U.S. coast. Windy conditions are likely in the southern Plains on Thursday and Friday as this storm system moves across the region, which may lead to increased evaporative demand in the region. Generally warmer than normal conditions are also forecast in much of the continental U.S., though short periods of cooler than normal weather may occur from Texas eastward to the Atlantic Coast.

Drought Monitor one week change map through December 11, 2018.

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