#Colorado Water Plan Update Is Underway — @AudubonRockies

> Great Blue Herons. Photo: Pamela Underhill Karaz/Audubon Photography Awards

From Audubon Rockies (Abby Burk):

Help define this moment for birds, rivers, and people.

What memories can you recall from five years ago? Well, you may remember that Colorado’s inaugural Water Plan had just been finalized in November of 2015. The Audubon network, our partners, and Coloradans were key in defining the plan. Five years of plan implementation have flown by. As the plan moves forward in its first update, what have we learned to set the course for necessary immediate and long-term steps to ensure water security for people and the environment? We need your statewide engagement, again.

The Water Plan in Short

Colorado’s Water Plan 2015 is a framework pointing the way toward safeguarding Colorado’s water values as population, water variability, and drought increase. Colorado’s water values are supporting healthy watersheds and the environment, robust recreation and tourism economies, vibrant and sustainable cities, and viable and productive agriculture.

The plan’s foundation stands on work by Colorado’s nine basin roundtables and their basin implementation plans, the Interbasin Compact Committee, the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB), partners, and stakeholders statewide. The collaboration that fueled the Colorado Water Plan sparked the state’s largest civic engagement and the CWCB received more than 30,000 public comments on priorities and direction for the plan. Audubon’s network provided nearly 20 percent of general comments received, and Audubon staff provided consented technical environmental resilience and stream ecology language. The top-two categories of all public comments received were support for healthy rivers and better use of water in cities and towns. The unprecedented public engagement truly produced Colorado’s Water Plan.

Without a strong plan and funding for implementation, Colorado’s birds, rivers, and people will face a problematic future with unacceptable consequences.

Why Update Now?

Colorado is changing and the Colorado Water Plan must be responsive. Our population is over 5.7 million today and could nearly double by 2060. With climate change increasing temperatures and making water supply less predictable, rivers are already stretched thin. Within the next few decades, even assuming aggressive water conservation and the completion of dozens of water projects currently being considered, the state could face a shortfall that exceeds 500,000 acre-feet annually.

The plan update will complete in 2022 and map Colorado water resource management for the next seven years. As a headwaters state, the value of Colorado’s rivers flows far beyond its boundaries. Healthy, flowing rivers support all water uses and users—both wildlife and people. Protecting rivers protects our economy, our birds, and our way of life, but their future is uncertain. Audubon was closely involved in the creation of the plan and currently is involved in its implementation. Now, five years later, we’re helping to update the plan.

(Abby Burk and other experts explain how Colorado can best update the Colorado Water Plan.)

How to Engage

Audubon is committed to protecting the health of Colorado’s rivers, ecosystems, and sustainable water supplies—values that benefit everyone. We are working across water interests to show that water connects rather than separates us. Together, we can protect Colorado’s incredible rivers and the birds that depend upon them. Public input on the Colorado Water Plan update will be critical. Here’s how you can participate:

Engage in Your Local Basin

Each of Colorado’s nine basin roundtables has been updating their local water supply and management plans called basin implementation plans (BIPs). Updated BIPs will soon be ready for public review. Click on your basin here to find your basin roundtable website, then click through to the BIP update status. Updated BIPs are getting ready to roll out soon. Also, due to COVID-19 concerns, basin roundtables have been meeting virtually. If you have not already, you can attend a virtual basin roundtable meeting to get to know your basin’s scope of work and your basin’s hardworking volunteers leading local water management efforts.

Engage on the State Plan

Everyone needs healthy rivers. Our hope is that this plan update will represent not only the human needs, but also a healthy ecosystem on which we and our wildlife depend. Currently, the Colorado Water Conservation Board is collecting survey feedback on the direction for the Colorado Water Plan update. Staff and stakeholder input has informed the current thinking, which is summarized in five informational sheets: Water Plan Update Vision, Vibrant Communities, Robust Agriculture, Thriving Watersheds, and Resilient Planning. Please review the information sheets and fill out the survey here.

Audubon Rockies will be asking for local involvement through comments on the basin implementation plans and the statewide plan, so be on the lookout for more timely ways you can engage!

2 thoughts on “#Colorado Water Plan Update Is Underway — @AudubonRockies

  1. Wow, 500,000 acre feet. That’s a lot of water. 163 Billion gallons. This is not sustainable and unacceptable. Here in Florida are floodplains, swamps, wetlands, etc. Have been artificially drained through the use of canals. These canals are then connected to our Waterways and eventually flow to our oceans.
    Now are public officials are building Recharge parks and looking for a alternative Water Source.
    Florida has over 21 million relying on Our Groundwater, that Aquifer, that is just below our feet. The 21 million are the mammals that are called humans. How much Wildlife rely on that same Groundwater Source?
    These artificial drainage canals have flowed our Drinking water straight to the ocean and now we are dealing with Saltwater intrusion in Our Groundwater source.
    When we stop the artificial drainage and start allowing our floodplains, swamps and wetlands to fill and recharge our groundwater. The Saltwater Intrusion problem will be reduced.
    Thanks for the article and great info. #MniWiconi #WaterIsLife #RightstoCleanWater #RightsofNature #BythePeople #ForthePeople #United #WeCan and #TogetherWecanDoMore #OverturnCitizensUnited

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