ADWR Director Tom Buschatzke Comments on Secretary Bernhardt Initiating an Early Review of Current Colorado River Operational Rules in Recent U.S. Department of Interior Press Release — Arizona Water News

“Collaborative efforts with the United States, the Basin States and their water users and Mexico have been key to the success of managing water supplies, creating resiliency against drought and a more sustainable Colorado River…” – Tom Buschatzke, Director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources. Read More

via ADWR Director Tom Buschatzke Comments on Secretary Bernhardt Initiating an Early Review of Current Colorado River Operational Rules in Recent U.S. Department of Interior Press Release — Arizona Water News

Mental health issues? Running very far in wild places may help — Katie Klingsporn

On her quest to run a multi-day ultramarathon on each continent, Aussie Jacqui Bell slogged through endless deserts, landscapes of ice and breathtaking coasts. She also found a way to fight her personal demons. Originally published on Nov. 11 in Adventure Journal. A couple years ago, Jacqui Bell’s world turned dark. After being plagued by […]

via Mental health issues? Running very far in wild places may help — Katie Klingsporn

The latest “Gunnison River Basin News” is hot off the presses from the Gunnison Basin Roundtable

Sean Cronin and John McClow at the 2014 CFWE President’s Award Reception

Click here to read the newsletter. Here’s an excerpt:

Here are a few of the reasons 2019 was a year to
CELEBRATE in the Gunnison River Basin

  • Year of plenty with full reservoirs & ditches!
  • The Gunnison Basin Roundtable had another successful year in their continued support of water users, water education and through management of grants for important projects from headwaters to mouth.
  • Completion of significant water use efficiency improvements within the Lower Gunnison Basin Project.
  • Blue Mesa played a huge role in meeting flow targets in the critical reaches while providing full supply to irrigators; Taylor Park, Paonia, Crawford & Ridgway Reservoirs met both human & environmental needs. as well.
  • Major agreements were signed benefiting not only our basin but all of the much larger Colorado River Basin as evidenced by the Drought Contingency Plan, approved by all seven basin states & Congress helping to ensure that we keep our eye on the prize – healthy Lake Powell & Lake Mead levels to maintain vital hydropower generation & compact compliance for all.
  • And one more of the many reasons to celebrate, one of our own,- John McClow was named Aspinall Water Leader of the Year.
  • Loveland: American Water Works Association, Rocky Mountain Section, “2020 Action Now Seminar,” February 20, 2020

    The water treatment process

    Click here to register:

    Action Now seminars are geared toward providing water industry personnel with current information and training addressing relevant issues in the water industry. They also provide an excellent opportunity to meet, exchange ideas, and problem-solve with fellow associates. CO Certification Training Units (TU’s) for attending this program will be issued on the CCWP Portal after the completion of this seminar.

    #ColoradoRiver Water Users Association Annual Conference recap: “ClimateChange is #water change” — @BradUdall #CRWUA2019 #COriver #DCP #aridification

    Lake Mead, behind Hoover Dam, shows the effects of nearly two decades of drought. (Image: Bureau of Reclamation)

    From The Sante Fe Reporter (Laura Paskus):

    Water wonks, state and tribal officials, attorneys and irrigation district representatives hit the floor at Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel last week. Not to shake loose the slots. But to gamble on the future of the Colorado River.

    During the annual meeting of the Colorado River Water Users Association (CRWUA), stakeholders from the seven US states that share the river’s water met to talk about everything from interagency cooperation to cloud seeding, forecasting to tribal water rights.

    But even as the impacts of the Earth’s warming are increasingly clear, there’s still a political and practical disconnect between the cause of climate change—the burning of fossil fuels—and the challenges warming poses to water supplies in the western United States.

    That decoupling was hammered home by US Department of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, who spoke at the CRWUA meeting. During his keynote speech, Bernhardt avoided mentioning climate change.

    When pressed by reporters afterwards, he said he “certainly believe[s] the climate is changing.” But he cautioned that forecasting is speculative.

    David Bernhardt answers a question about climate change from Luke Runyon, December 13, 2019, Colorado River Water Users Association Annual Conference.

    And he praised the role energy development plays in states like New Mexico.

    “The president was very clear when he ran for office on his position on energy; he’s for an all-of-the-above approach,” Bernhardt said. “In New Mexico last year, we sent $1.7 billion from federal lands to the state of New Mexico that went to schools and other things. So, when people tell me they want to stop oil and gas development on federal lands, I say ‘Call the governor of New Mexico.'”

    Gov Michelle Lujan Grisham’s office could not answer SFR’s questions by deadline about Bernhardt’s claims related to revenues from drilling on federal land in New Mexico and balancing the disconnect between the state’s energy policies—which have spiked revenues—and emissions from that industry, which exacerbate the state’s water challenges.

    The governor’s spokeswoman also could not provide a response to Bernhardt’s statements before deadline…

    Brad Udall: “…latest version of my 4-Panel plot thru Water Year (Oct-Sep) of 2019 of the #coriver big reservoirs, natural flows, precipitation, and temperature. Data goes back or 1906 (or 1935 for reservoirs.) This updates previous work with
    @GreatLakesPeck

    In 2017, a peer-reviewed study showed that warming was already causing flows on the Colorado River to decline. Between 2000 and 2014, flows averaged 19% below the 1906-1999 average, and scientists found that one-third of those losses were due to higher temperatures, rather than changes in precipitation. They also wrote that if warming continues, the Colorado River’s flows will drop even more—20 to 35% by 2050, and 30 to 55% by 2100.

    A follow-up study in 2018 showed that even though annual precipitation in the Colorado River Basin increased slightly between 1916 and 2014, flows declined by 16.5 % during that same time period—due in large part to “unprecedented basin-wide warming.”

    “Climate change is water change,” says Bradley Udall, one of the co-authors of both those studies. Udall is a senior water and climate research scientist at the Colorado Water Institute at Colorado State University.

    In arid landscapes like the US Southwest, warming affects river flows, snowpack, soil moisture and even the amount of water crops and forests need to survive.

    “In our case, [climate change] means these longer, hotter droughts that threaten the Rio Grande and the Colorado River system in ways that are unprecedented,” Udall tells SFR.

    “If you’re going to reduce the risk of water shortages for humans and nature, you’ve got to solve the climate change problem.”

    And, he says, solving the climate change problem means stopping fossil fuel production: “You can’t solve climate change if you’re going to continue to pursue fossil fuel production willy-nilly.”

    And yet, drilling is booming across the world, including in New Mexico. And that development has consequences.

    Per capita annual carbon dioxide emissions and cumulative country emissions. Data from the Global Carbon Project. Nature. Data from the Global Carbon Project

    Earlier this year, the World Meteorological Organization showed that carbon emissions have continued to increase. According to a story in the BBC, “Using data from monitoring stations in the Arctic and all over the world, researchers say that in 2018 concentrations of CO2 reached 407.8 parts per million (ppm), up from 405.5ppm a year previously. This increase was above the average for the last 10 years and is 147% of the “pre-industrial” level in 1750.” Not only that, but methane emissions continue to rise, as well—and is now at 259 % what it was before the Industrial Revolution.

    Meanwhile, global temperatures continue to ruse. The latest numbers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show that the three-month season of September through November 2019 ranked second-warmest on record for the globe—with a global temperature of 1.69°F above average. Already, New Mexico’s average annual temperature has increased by 2°F—just since the 1970s.

    Continued warming will have continued impacts across the US Southwest. And even after last winter’s robust snowpack, the basin’s reservoirs, system-wide, sit at just over half-full. The two largest reservoirs, Lake Powell and Lake Mead, are 52 % and 40 % full, respectively. A second year of good snowpack, Udall estimates, would put the system at perhaps 60 % full…

    Asked to rectify that with the president’s statements about climate change as a “hoax” and his attacks on climate science, Bernhardt reiterated that Trump has been an “exceptional leader on western water issues.”

    “I think it’s very hard to go back and find presidents who have given clear direction in memos to the secretaries, [that] say ‘Get on with it. Solve these situations,'” he said, referring to Trump’s 2018 presidential memorandum on reliable water supplies in the western US. In that memo, the White House directed federal agencies, including Interior, to “work together to minimize unnecessary regulatory burdens and foster more efficient decision-making so that water projects are better able to meet the demands of their authorized purposes.”

    Bernhardt also directed the US Bureau of Reclamation to launch its review of the 2007 interim guidelines at the beginning of 2020.

    Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman supports collaboration and cooperation between Basins within the confines of the Compact. (Source: Water Education Foundation)

    From The Las Vegas Review Journal (Shea Johnson) via The Boulder City Review:

    U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman said Dec. 11 that Nevada has been a national leader in water conservation by reducing demand on the Colorado River and investing in infrastructure over the past two decades.

    In Las Vegas for the Colorado River Water Users Association’s annual conference, Burman declined to say, however, whether she sees Nevada’s share of the river’s water increasing, even though it draws the least amount of water than any other state.

    Instead she said Mexico and seven Southwestern states served by the river were focused on working within the existing rules and regulations, known as the “Law of the River.”

    In an interview with the Review-Journal, Burman said that “desalination is going to be part of the answer” to reducing draws on the river, noting that California has already made major investments on that front, and talks between Mexico and lower basin states have questioned whether desalination is possible in that country.

    “We all really need to be looking at an all-of-the-above approach,” she said about viable long-term solutions to river sustainability…

    The three-day annual conference culminated with a tour of Hoover Dam with federal officials. It followed a keynote speech by Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt.