Rocky Mountain Climate Organization releases reports on projected climate extremes September 22, 2016

The figure above shows how the number of days 95° or hotter in the Denver metro area could go from an average of 5 per year late in the last century to 77 per year late in this century. For future periods, the figure shows the range of the middle 80 percent of projections from multiple climate models (the checkered portions of the columns) and the medians (the numerals), for four possible levels of future heat-trapping emissions. Graphic via the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.
The figure above shows how the number of days 95° or hotter in the Denver metro area could go from an average of 5 per year late in the last century to 77 per year late in this century. For future periods, the figure shows the range of the middle 80 percent of projections from multiple climate models (the checkered portions of the columns) and the medians (the numerals), for four possible levels of future heat-trapping emissions. Graphic via the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

Here’s the release from RMCO:

The Rocky Mountain Climate Organization released two parallel reports on projected climate extremes, one covering Boulder County and the other Larimer County, both in Colorado. RMCO also released the results from the first phase of a similar analysis covering the entire Denver metro area.

The analyses show what could be an astonishing transformation of Colorado’s climate. With a continuation of current trends in heat-trapping emissions, by the middle of the century Denver could average 35 days a year 95 degrees or hotter. Boulder could average 38, and Fort Collins 24. By late in the century, Denver could average 77 days that hot, Boulder could average 75, and Fort Collins could average 58.

“This information shows why we need preparedness actions to address the impacts we could face, not only wildfires and possibly more floods but also more heat waves that can threaten people’s health and even lives,” Saunders said. “It also powerfully illustrates how important it is to reduce future emissions to keep the extent of climate change within manageable limits.”

The reports covering Boulder County and Larimer County were funded by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, to help those counties become more resilient in the face of climate change’s impacts on future disasters including wildfires and floods. The Denver analysis is funded by the City and County of Denver’s Department of Environmental Health.

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