“The term regenerative agriculture has been around for more than 80 years but with the very real threat of climate change, the words have taken on new importance” — Libby James

Credit: http://www.regenerativeagriculturedefinition.com

From The North Forty News (Libby James). Click through and read the whole article to learn about some local efforts. Here’s an excerpt:

The term regenerative agriculture has been around for more than 80 years but with the very real threat of climate change, the words have taken on new importance. The United States Congress called the waste of soil and moisture resources in farmland across the country a “menace to the national welfare.” Early in the 1930s, Congress reacted by establishing what has become NRCS, the National Resources Conservation Service, confirming the government’s commitment to conserving the nation’s soil and water resources.

The first soil experiment stations were established as early as 1929 and in 1932, under President Roosevelt’s New Deal, demonstration projects in eroded areas pointed out the benefits of soil conversation with farmers experiencing the devastating effects of the Dust Bowl. Widespread crop failures had exposed the soil to blowing winds noticed as far away as Washington DC and 300 miles out into the Atlantic Ocean.

By 1936 the government had initiated plans for flood control, drainage, and irrigation. Three thousand conservation districts were established across the country. A thousand dams were built on 2,000 watershed projects.

A drought in the 1950s resulted in the Great Plains Conservation Act that provided financial assistance to farmers for retiring cropland and planting protective cover crops. More laws were passed in the 1960s and the first Earth Day was held in 1970. Another farm crisis in the 1990s resulted in establishing tillage practices and restoration projects worked to select seeds and plants suitable for reviving wetlands and prairies.

More financial help and innovative programs aimed at evaluating conservation issues were undertaken by the government in that decade. And still, solutions remained elusive.

Today concerns with global warming have come increasingly to the forefront making efforts to promote regenerative agriculture more important than ever before.

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