#Virginia becomes the first Southern state with a goal of #carbonfree energy — The Washington Post #ActOnClimate #KeepItInTheGround

Emissions trading is one example of a market-based solution to an environmental problem. Image credit: Arnold Paul/Gralo via Wikipedia.

From The Washington Post (Gregory S. Schneider):

The coronavirus is scrambling Virginia’s budget and economy, but it didn’t prevent Gov. Ralph Northam (D) from signing legislation that makes it the first Southern state with a goal of going carbon-free by 2045.

Over the weekend, Northam authorized the omnibus Virginia Clean Economy Act, which mandates that the state’s biggest utility, Dominion Energy, switch to renewable energy by 2045. Appalachian Power, which serves far southwest Virginia, must go carbon-free by 2050.

Almost all the state’s coal plants will have to shut down by the end of 2024 under the new law. Virginia is the first state in the old Confederacy to embrace such clean-energy targets.

Under a separate measure, Virginia also becomes the most Southern state to join the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative — a carbon cap-and-trade market among states in the Northeast.

What we do and do not know about COVID-19’s infectivity and viral load — The Conversation


SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient and imaged using a transmission electron micrograph.
NIAID

Marta Gaglia, Tufts University and Seema Lakdawala, University of Pittsburgh

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads, it has become clear that people need to understand basic facts about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to make informed health care and public policy decisions. Two basic virological concepts have gotten a lot of attention recently – the “infectious dose” and the “viral load” of SARS-CoV-2.

As influenza virologists, these are concepts that we often think about when studying respiratory virus infections and transmission.

What is an ‘infectious dose’?

The infectious dose is the amount of virus needed to establish an infection. Depending on the virus, people need to be exposed to as little as 10 virus particles – for example, for influenza viruses – or as many as thousands for other human viruses to get infected.

Scientists do not know how many virus particles of SARS-CoV-2 are needed to trigger infection. COVID-19 is clearly very contagious, but this may be because few particles are needed for infection (the infectious dose is low), or because infected people release a lot of virus in their environment.

What is the ‘viral load’?

The viral load is the amount of a specific virus in a test sample taken from a patient. For COVID-19, that means how many viral genomes are detected in a nasopharyngeal swab from the patient. The viral load reflects how well a virus is replicating in an infected person. A high viral load for SARS-CoV2 detected in a patient swab means a large number of coronavirus particles are present in the patient.

Is a high viral load linked to higher risk of severe pneumonia or death?

Intuitively it might make sense to say the more virus, the worse the disease. But in reality the situation is more complicated.

In the case of the original SARS or influenza, whether a person develops mild symptoms or pneumonia depends not only on how much virus is in their lungs, but also on their immune response and their overall health.

Right now it is unclear whether the SARS-CoV-2 viral load can tell us who will get severe pneumonia. Two studies in The Lancet reported people who develop more severe pneumonia tend to have, on average, higher viral loads when they are first admitted to the hospital.

These studies also reported that the viral loads remain higher for more days in patients with more severe disease. However, the difference was not dramatic, and people with similar viral loads went on to develop both mild and severe disease.

Complicating the picture further, other studies found that some asymptomatic patients had similar viral loads to patients with COVID-19 symptoms. This means that the viral load alone is not a clear predictor of disease outcome.

Another common question is whether getting a higher virus dose upon infection – for example, through prolonged exposure to an infected person, like health care workers’ experience – will result in more severe disease. Right now, we simply do not know whether this is the case.

Does high viral load increase ability to pass the virus to others?

In general, the more virus you have in your airways, the more you will release when you exhale or cough, although there is a lot of person-to-person variation. Multiple studies have reported that patients have the highest viral load of the coronavirus at the time they are diagnosed.

This means that patients transmit COVID-19 more effectively at the beginning of their illness, or even before they know they are sick. This is bad news. It means people who look and feel healthy can transmit the virus to others.

Why is it hard to answer basic questions about virus amounts for SARS-CoV-2?

Normally, researchers like us determine the characteristics of a virus from a combination of highly controlled experimental studies in animal models and epidemiological observations from patients.

But since SARS-CoV-2 is a new virus, the research community is only just beginning to do controlled experiments. Therefore, all the information we have comes from observing patients who were all infected in different ways, have different underlying health conditions, and are of different ages and both sexes. This diversity makes it difficult to make strong conclusions that will apply to everyone from only observational data.

Where does the uncertainty on viral loads and infectious dose leave us?

Studying viral loads and the infectious dose will likely be important to make better decisions for health care providers. For the rest of us, regardless of the viral load of patients or the SARS-CoV-2 infectious dose, it is best to reduce exposure to any amount of virus, since it is clear the virus is transmitted efficiently from person to person.

Current social distancing practices and limited contact with groups of people in enclosed spaces will reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, the use of face masks will reduce the amount of virus released from presymptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. So stay home and stay safe.

[Get facts about coronavirus and the latest research. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter.]The Conversation

Marta Gaglia, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology & Microbiology, Tufts University and Seema Lakdawala, Assisstant Professor, University of Pittsburgh

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

A video message from Denver Water’s CEO on COVID-19 — News on TAP

Jim Lochhead provides an overview of the utility’s response, along with pictures of employees keeping the water flowing during the shelter-in-place order. The post A video message from Denver Water’s CEO on COVID-19 appeared first on News on TAP.

via A video message from Denver Water’s CEO on COVID-19 — News on TAP

America’s MostEndangered Rivers®of 2020 — @AmericanRivers

Graphic credit: American Rivers

Click here to read the report. Here’s an excerpt:

LIFE NEEDS RIVERS

It’s not just that rivers make our lives better. We cannot survive without them.

Healthy rivers give us critical services, from clean drinking water to flood protection. They support local businesses and strong economies. They give us opportunities to get out, be healthy, and enjoy the beauty and wonder of the natural world. And rivers connect us — to each other and to our future.

But climate change threatens our rivers and all of the benefits they provide. Maybe you’ve seen the impacts where you live: devastating floods, massive superstorms, crushing droughts.

That’s why now is the time to be bold. To make sure our rivers and water withstand the damage climate change will inflict. And to make sure people of color, low-income communities and Indigenous Peoples — who will be hardest hit by the climate crisis — can take the lead on crafting the solutions and making the decisions that will shape their lives.

America’s Most Endangered Rivers® of 2020 highlights what’s at stake — and the solutions we can choose to create a better future.
Life needs rivers, and rivers need us.

Meat Processing Plants Close as Working Conditions Encourage Spread of #Coronavirus — EcoWatch #COVID19

Photo credit: BakeryAndSnacks.com

From EcoWatch (Olivia Rosane):

Meat processing plants across the U.S. and Canada are being forced to close as employees sicken with the new coronavirus, raising concerns both for the meat supply chain and worker safety at the often crowded plants.

One of the biggest closures to date was Sunday’s indefinite shuttering of a Smithfield Foods plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota that is responsible for around five percent of the U.S. daily pork supply, as The Associated Press reported. Its closure came after almost 300 of its 3,700 workers tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19…

Other plants have shut their doors, at least temporarily, according to Reuters. They include:

  • A JBS USA plant in Greeley, Colorado that is responsible for five percent of the U.S. daily beef slaughter, which said Monday it would close until April 24.
  • A Tyson Foods hog slaughterhouse in Columbus Junction, Iowa that said Monday it would extend an April 6 closure for another week.
  • A National Beef Packing Co. plant in Tama, Iowa that suspended cattle slaughtering until the week of April 20.
  • An Olymel pork plant in Yamachiche, Quebec, that closed for two weeks starting March 29.
  • A Maple Leaf Foods poultry plant in Brampton, Ontario that suspended production April 8.
  • Overall, hundreds of workers have fallen ill at plants in Colorado, South Dakota, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Mississippi and other locations, according to The Associated Press.

    Meat processing workers are particularly vulnerable to infection because they stand very close to each other on assembly lines and share crowded locker rooms.