Snowpack news: “Water planners would rather have some big storms falling right now” — Mike Nelson

Westwide SNOTEL snow water equivalent as a percent of normal February 6, 2015 via the NRCS
Westwide SNOTEL snow water equivalent as a percent of normal February 6, 2015 via the NRCS

From TheDenverChannel.com (Marc Stewart):

“Water planners would rather have some big storms falling right now and packing that up so you don’t depend upon a storm coming in — in late March and April,” said Nelson.

7NEWS traveled to Lake Dillon in Summit County to check on water levels, and for the moment, the levels are above average.

Yet, Denver Water is always watching.

“You never know when the next dry period is going to come and even more important, you never know how long it’s going to last,” said Denver Water spokesperson Travis Thompson.

Sunny days in Colorado may bring smiles, but they also generate uncertainty.

“In a state like Colorado, water is gold,” said Nelson.

From Inkstain (John Fleck):

January was dry in the water-producing parts of the Colorado River Basin.

The official Feb. 1 forecast for the Colorado River above Lake Powell (the part of the Basin where all the water comes from) calls for just 80 percent of median April-July inflow. That’s a big drop from the Jan. 1 forecast, which called for inflow of normal (and by “normal” I mean at the median).

That’s about 1.2 million acre feet less inflow forecast.

Click on a thumbnail graphic below to view a gallery of snowpack data from the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

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