Dolores River Restoration Partnership annual report


From Telluride Daily Planet (Stephen Elliott):

In a presentation to the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners at their meeting Wednesday, Nature Conservancy Southwest Colorado Project Director Peter Mueller updated the board on the work of the Dolores River Restoration Partnership, a private-public partnership that works to preserve the wildlife and ecology of the river that starts in the San Juan Mountains and runs to its confluence with the Colorado River near Moab…

In 2014, according to Mueller, the DRRP developed and approved a transition plan for long-term monitoring and maintenance of the river, which sets forth strategies for fundraising, communications, governance and physical conservation work needed to support the diversity and health of the Dolores River’s riparian corridor for the next five years.

The DRRP works to preserve the habitat surrounding the Dolores River, and it has done well at that in the six years since it started implementing its ecological goals. But that’s not all DRRP wants to accomplish, Mueller said…

A significant part of DRRP’s workforce comes from Conservation Corps crews, which are made up of young adults typically aged 18 to 24, “consistent with out commitment to the next generation of stewards,” according to the DRRP’s 2014 annual report.

In 2014, 49 members of those teams contributed a combined 13,400 hours of work restoring the Dolores River, including an average of 130 hours per person of training…

In addition to ecological and social goals, the DRRP 2014 annual report outlines the economic impact the partnership had on the local community. According to the report, the total amount of money that went into the local economy because of the group’s expenditures, job creation and partnerships was $1,182,800.

The Colorado Nonprofit Association awarded the DRRP the 2014 Colorado Collaboration Award at a ceremony in October, a state-wide award that goes to an organization that exemplifies collaboration between many different entities, and it comes with a $50,000 prize, which the DRRP says will be used to “support long-term stewardship of the Dolores River.”

At the time, Colorado Nonprofit Association President and CEO Renny Fagan applauded the DRRP for its success at bringing different groups together to work toward a common goal.

“The Dolores River Restoration Partnership is an outstanding example of how nonprofits, businesses and government agencies are working together,” Fagan said. “Collaborating isn’t always easy. It takes a lot of work and commitment, but when we get together and identify our common goals, we can accomplish remarkable things.”

More Dolores River watershed coverage here.

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