May storms have caused millions of dollars in damage throughout Pikes Peak region — The Colorado Springs Gazette

Pikes Peak with Garden of the Gods in the foreground
Pikes Peak with Garden of the Gods in the foreground

From The Colorado Springs Gazette (Billie Stanton Anleu and Ryan Maye Handy):

Millions of dollars in damage has county officials preparing to request state and federal emergency money…

Swelling of North Rockrimmon Creek has torn chunks of back yards and retaining wall boulders from two houses in Rockrimmon. The saturated soils are so heavy, the banks of the creek gave way from sheer weight, said Travis Easton, public works director for Colorado Springs…

Damage was severe on Ute Pass Trail near Green Mountain Falls, at Rainbow Falls near Manitou Springs and in Bear Creek Park, said Jason Meyer, project manager with the county’s Community Services Department planning division…

Potholes, erosion, flooding and sewer system glitches now have the city’s public works staff responding to too many calls to count, Easton said…

The Colorado Springs Airport got 1.26 inches on May 4, breaking the 1902 record of 1.23 inches for that day, said Randy Gray, meteorological technician for the National Weather Service.

The Broadmoor area had received 7.36 inches and Manitou Springs, 7.32 inches, this month as of Wednesday, Gray said.

The Northgate area east of Interstate 25 had received 6.81 inches through Tuesday, he said…

The county’s quest for state emergency funds hinges on documenting $2.1 million worth of damage in the county and all its cities, Meyer said. If the state reaches the $6.9 million threshold, it can request money from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), he added.

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