#Snowpack news: Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District is beating the conservation drum

Westwide SNOTEL basin-filled map March 17, 2018 via the NRCS.

From The Pagosa Sun (Chris Mannara):

With the possibility of a dry spring hitting Pagosa Springs, Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District (PAWSD) General Manager Justin Ramsey wants to make sure citizens are a little bit more mindful with their water use.

“We’re at 52 percent snowpack. And about three days ago that snow- pack started coming down. It’s start- ing to melt,” he explained.

According to Ramsey, the snowpack typically does not melt until early April.

“It could change, of course. It could get cold and start going back up again,” he noted. “But even if it waited until April, and it starts drop- ping in April, usually that snowpack ends sometime around the first of June.”

“Once we lose that snowpack the flows start dropping, we have to cut our water off at Four Mile, that goes to Hatcher, and we don’t get any more water from Hatcher until Sep- tember or October,” he added later.

The earlier that runoff is lost, the earlier water elevation is lost in local lakes, he explained.
In preparation of a dry spring, Ramsey advised community mem- bers to use their water wisely.

“Do the things that we always preach. Turn the water off when you brush your teeth, maybe let your lawn be a little browner than you’d typically like it,” he said.

The use of hose bibs while wash- ing your car is another way to use wa- ter wisely in the upcoming months, he mentioned.

“I’m not concerned that we’re going to run out of water. We cer- tainly have adequate water in our reservoirs,” he stated. “If we have two years in a row we could start getting in trouble, but it’s still going to lower those lakes down.”

The dry spring could become a potential problem; however, Ramsey notes that it is unlikely, but he still would like to see people use their water wisely.

2 thoughts on “#Snowpack news: Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District is beating the conservation drum

  1. […] “Once we lose that snowpack the flows start dropping, we have to cut our water off at Four Mile, that goes to Hatcher, and we don’t get any more water from Hatcher until September or October,” he added later. The earlier that runoff is lost, the earlier water elevation is lost in local lakes, he explained. In preparation of a dry spring, Ramsey advised community members to use their water wisely. “I’m not concerned that we’re going to run out of water. We certainly have adequate water in our reservoirs,” he stated. “If we have two years in a row we could start getting in trouble, but it’s still going to lower those lakes down.” To view the full article visit the Coyote Gulch. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s