Report scores #Colorado ‘C-’ in infrastructure: “Water consumption in Colorado is nearly 50% lower than the national average” — The Pueblo Chieftain

From The Pueblo Chieftain (Anthony A. Mestas):

The state’s report card on infrastructure is not necessarily one to hang on a refrigerator this year, as officials with the Colorado Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers said Thursday there is room for improvement.

The organization gave 14 categories of infrastructure in Colorado an overall grade of a ‘C-.’ The 2020 Report Card for Colorado’s Infrastructure was released Thursday…

According to the report, civil engineers evaluated the following individual categories: aviation (B), bridges (C+), dams (C+), drinking water (C-) [ed. empahasis mine], energy (C+), hazardous waste (C-), levees (D+), parks (C), rail (B-), roads (C-), schools (D+), solid waste (C-), transit (C-) and wastewater (C-). Schools received one of the lowest grades (D+), exhibiting needs that far exceed the funding available for necessary replacements, repairs or upgrades – adding up to an approximately $14 billion funding gap…

The Report Card, which did not list specific cities or areas in the state, was created as a public service to residents and policymakers to inform them of the infrastructure needs in their state. Civil engineers used their expertise and school report card letter grades to condense complicated data into an easy-to-understand analysis of Colorado’s infrastructure network…

Officials said though drinking water capacity is currently sufficient, some rural areas are challenged to provide clean water to their constituents due to aging pipelines.

Water consumption in Colorado is nearly 50% lower than the national average. Officials said that is mostly due to a successful public education program focusing on water conservation implemented in the early 2000s by various water utilities…

Dams scored about the national average at a “C+.” In Colorado, the number and quality of Emergency Action Plans have significantly increased: Today, approximately 98% of high hazard potential dams now have an EAP, putting fewer residents at risk in the event of a dam failure…

A full copy of the Report Card for Colorado’s Infrastructure is available at http://InfrastructureReportCard.org/Colorado.

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