No watering restrictions for Broomfield

Broomfield
Broomfield

From the Broomfield Enterprise (Megan Quinn):

Despite a dry March, Broomfield will not impose summer water restrictions this year after learning it will receive its typical allocation from its main water supplier.

The Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District last week announced it would provide users their typical amount of water from the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, because the storage reservoir is more full than normal. The district typically allocates about 70 percent of its supply for water users unless resources are limited. Last year, the allocation was 60 percent.

That means Broomfield residents won’t have to scrimp on water this summer, but officials are still asking residents to use only what they need…

Broomfield gets more than half of its water supply from the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, and the rest from Denver Water and the Windy Gap project. All three rely on mountain snowpack.

Water runoff from snowpack is a major indicator of how much water there will be for cities in the coming year.

Even though precipitation was just 21 percent of average in March, Northern Water’s overall water supplies are much higher than normal, said spokesman Brian Werner.

C-BT, which provides water for Broomfield and 32 other cities and towns, was “at an all-time high” for April 1, and other local storage reservoirs were above normal, Werner said.

On top of that, a large snowstorm on Thursday dumped more moisture in the high country, which “will help slow down the melt and keep us in good shape,” he said…

In Broomfield, single-family residential users account for 56 percent of total water use, according to the city’s 2013 water rate study.

Park Services Superintendent Gary Schnoor said Broomfield also is monitoring its water use. Conserving water is just as important for Broomfield as it is for its residents, especially because the parks department uses the most water of any department in Broomfield.

To conserve and reuse that water, about half of Broomfield’s parks, about 553 acres, are watered with reclaimed water.

“We pay per 1,000 gallons, just like you do at home. It’s one of our big budget items,” he said.

Caleb Davis, an irrigation systems coordinator for the city, said the dry March weather meant employees had to start watering parks a little earlier than usual.

Rain and snow can help save the city’s water supply. Last year, Broomfield used 380 million gallons of water on the parks and landscape.

Worst case, the parks department could use up to 500 million gallons during the driest years, Davis said.

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