Antarctic Surface Melt More Widespread Than Thought — @AndreaTWeather @ClimateCentral

From Climate Central (Andrea Thompson):

Since the days of the great early 20th century polar explorers, scientists have noticed the unbelievably bright blue ponds and streams of meltwater that can form on the glaciers and ice shelves of Antarctica and were even crucial to the recent collapse of one ice shelf.

While most research into Antarctic ice melt has concentrated on the impacts of warming ocean waters that are eating away at the ice from below, a new continent-wide survey shows that these surface meltwater drainage systems are much more prevalent around the continent than was previously thought.

Aspinall unit operations update

Aspinall Unit

From email from Reclamation (Erik Knight):

The April 15th forecast for the April – July unregulated inflow volume to Blue Mesa Reservoir is 850,000 acre-feet. This is 126% of the 30 year average. Snowpack in the Upper Gunnison Basin is currently 124% of average. Blue Mesa Reservoir current content is 623,000 acre-feet which is 75% of full. Current elevation is 7495.3 ft. Maximum content at Blue Mesa Reservoir is 829,500 acre-feet at an elevation of 7519.4 ft.

Black Canyon Water Right

The peak flow and shoulder flow components of the Black Canyon Water Right will be determined by the May 1 forecast of the April – July unregulated inflow volume to Blue Mesa Reservoir. If the May 1 forecast is equal to the current forecast of 850,000 acre-feet of runoff volume, the peak flow target will be equal to 6,427 cfs for a duration of 24 hours. The shoulder flow target will be 831 cfs, for the period between May 1 and July 25. The point of measurement of flows to satisfy the Black Canyon Water Right is the Gunnison River below Gunnison Tunnel streamgage at the upstream boundary of Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park.

Aspinall Unit Operations ROD

Pursuant to the Aspinall Unit Operations Record of Decision (ROD), the peak flow and duration flow targets in the lower Gunnison River, as measured at the Whitewater gage, will be determined by the forecast of the April – July unregulated inflow volume to Blue Mesa Reservoir and the hydrologic year type. At the time of the spring operation, if the forecast is equal to the current forecast of 850,000 acre-feet of runoff volume, the hydrologic year type will be set as Moderately Wet. Under a Moderately Wet year the peak flow target will be 14,350 cfs and the duration target at this flow will be 10 days. The duration target for the half bankfull flow of 8,070 cfs will be 40 days.

Projected Spring Operations

During spring operations, releases from the Aspinall Unit will be made in an attempt to match the peak flow of the North Fork of the Gunnison River to maximize the potential of meeting the desired peak at the Whitewater gage, while simultaneously meeting the Black Canyon Water Right peak flow amount. The magnitude of release necessary to meet the desired peak at the Whitewater gage will be dependent on the flow contribution from the North Fork of the Gunnison River and other tributaries downstream from the Aspinall Unit. Current projections for spring peak operations show that flows in the Gunnison River through the Black Canyon could be over 9,000 cfs for 10 days in order to achieve the desired peak flow and duration at Whitewater. If actual flows on the North Fork of the Gunnison River are less than currently projected, flows through the Black Canyon could be even higher. With this runoff forecast and corresponding downstream targets, Blue Mesa Reservoir is currently projected to fill to an elevation of around 7507 feet with an approximate peak content of 719,000 acre-feet.

#Runoff news: McPhee scheduled releases into Dolores River

Dolores River near Bedrock

From CanoeKayak.com (Eugene Buchanan):

The Dolores River Monitoring and Recommendation team recently agreed on a plan to release water from the dam, which involved input from water managers, boaters, scientists, environmental groups, federal lands agencies, and local governments.

Surplus water is expected to spill from the McPhee Dam from April 13 until mid-June, with 45 to 60 days of flow planned at 2,000 cubic feet per second. Water managers plan to release an even larger burst of water, expected at 4,000 cfs, during three days in late May (May 19-22). Scientists say the extra water will flush extra sediment downstream and create better habitat for native fish.

“That’s a great flow level, something we haven’t seen in years,” says local rafter Sean McNamara. “Bring on Snaggletooth!”

Despite the extra water, water managers say all water allocations will be met, including those for agricultural use.

Waldo Canyon burn scar still a flash flood threat after five years

Waldo Canyon Fire burn scar

From KOAA.com (Lena Howland):

In order to mitigate the risk, the city has been working on a number of stormwater projects along North Douglas Creek, South Douglas Creek and Camp Creek, all runoff areas from the burn scar.

“We have not let our guard down, ever since the Waldo Canyon Fire, we’ve had so many opportunities to do repairs and projects in order to prevent any more damage coming from the burn scar, as much as practical,” Kelley said.

All lessons learned, Kelley says they are more prepared to handle flash floods now than they were five years ago.

“We have an operations and maintenance division which responds on the spot to any types of flooding concerns, our emergency operations center is fully functioning and everybody is prepared for this type of an event to occur,” he said.

The City of Colorado Springs has created an Emergency Preparedness Manual for everyone which can be found here.

Gov. Hickenlooper town hall recap

From The Prowers Journal (Russ Baldwin):

“Colorado basically has the number one economy in America,” the governor remarked, stressing that the demands for agricultural products will remain one of our economic mainstays as it did to help the country out of the Great Depression decades ago. Hickenlooper acknowledged the disparity of growth between the Front Range and rural areas of the state, explaining that he wants to see more technological growth in rural areas including more access to broadband capabilities in the smallest towns in the state.

The governor addressed changing technologies as well, “Automation has begun to eliminate a lot of jobs in the U.S.,” he explained, adding that this change can foster tremendous wealth in some companies which flows upwards to the top 1% earnings bracket. “I’d like to see a way to recoup some of that wealth. I believe the top 1% has an obligation to help create and develop new industries; not as a hand-out, but as a way of sustaining job growth for new sectors of the economy.” The governor also mentioned employing the new Jumpstart program which can provide tax incentives to new businesses after they have been in operation for several years…

John Stulp gave a brief description of future water demands in Colorado, given the state’s growing population. “We’re going to see as many people move to the state over the next 30 years as there will be born from current residents,” he explained, saying that will double the current 5,000,000 residents by the year 2050. Stulp said this will call for more efficient uses of energy and conversation measures as well as planning ahead for additional water storage throughout Colorado.

Regarding the development of more solar and wind power in Colorado, Governor Hickenlooper said it is remarkable that for the first time in almost 50 years, the country will be in a position to be a net exporter of energy by 2018. He said we are facing a challenge with the construction of transmission lines in the region. “The city doesn’t build them, the county doesn’t either. It has to go through the Public Utilities Commission and that is a long and involved process and they are held responsible for making the most cost-effective decisions for their customers.” The governor said he believed the state will see increased construction and use of wind and solar power in the years to come.

The meeting was attended by numerous elected officials as well as representatives of local government and civic organizations. When asked if the topics covered in the public meeting were any different from an earlier private meeting the governor held with some of those officials, the Prowers County Commissioners said some other topics included the on-going issues with conservation easements and the impact CDPHE rulings would have on small communities with regard to maintenance of their landfills.

Weekly Climate, Water and #Drought Assessment of the Intermountain West — @ColoradoClimate

Upper Colorado River Basin month to date precipitation through April 17, 2017 via the Colorado Climate Center.

Click here to read the current assessment. Click here to go to the NIDIS website hosted by the Colorado Climate Center.

Here’s the 28 day streamflow map from the USGS.

The water year 2017 melt-out has started. Graphic credit USGS via the Colorado Climate Center.

Water Values Podcast: Prize Winning Water Innovators & The Problems They Are Solving

From The Water Values (David McGimpsey):

Episode TWV #100!!! Three prize winning water innovators from around the globe come on The Water Values Podcast to describe their innovations, the problem they sought to solve and how their innovations solve those problems. These innovators are based in Europe, Nepal and Uganda, so we really spanned the globe for you on this episode. Ku McMahan (from TWV #059) also returns to provide a quick introduction as to how Securing Water For Food chose these innovators as their prize winners. It’s a great study in innovation and problem solving by first examining the problem and they crafting solutions to remedy the problem.

In this session, you’ll learn about:

  • Securing Water For Food and what it does
  • How silicone helps plants increase crop yields
  • How silicone makes for hardier plants
  • Why silicone is so difficult to get into plants
  • How NewSil solved the problem of getting silicone into plants
  • Why Nepal, a land of 6,000 rivers, has trouble providing irrigation to riparian lands capable of being farmed
  • How aQysta developed a water wheel that allows previously non-irrigated land along rivers to become irrigable
  • Why digesters in Africa are abandoned so quickly after installation for lack of sufficient water
  • How Green Heat figured out how to reduce water use in digesters and produced a valuable byproduct along the way